The Ethics of … Capturing: Panel Talk at the Photographers’ Gallery

The Ethics of… Capturing

Tue 28 May 2019 : 18:30 – 20:30

A Collaboration between The Photographers’ Gallery and the Centre for Philosophy and the Visual Arts at King’s College London

Photography plays a powerful and pervasive role in contemporary society, and raises a series of complex ethical questions for photographers, their subjects, curators, and audiences. For example, who or what should be captured, and by whom? When, if ever, should we refuse to photograph or be photographed? Which images should be circulated? When should we look, or look away?

In the lead up to TPG’s 50th anniversary in 2021, The Ethics of Photographyis a series of events bringing together practitioners, curators, academics, and other stakeholders, to discuss the enduring ethical issues at the heart of photography. Looking back through a selection of pathbreaking exhibitions from the Gallery’s archive, we explore in depth the moral issues connected with the images at hand.

This first event unpicks The Ethics of… Capturing, with reflection on TPG’s opening exhibition The Concerned Photographer. Questions addressed, both relevant to then and now, include: Does a photographer have a distinct set of artistic, ethical, and professional obligations, different from those of (other) visual artists? Or are there people/objects/scenes that should not be captured or circulated?

Speakers include Paul Lowe, photographer and Course Leader for MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at London College of Communication; Laura Pannack, British social documentary and portrait photographer; Dawn M Wilson, Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Hull; and chaired by Sarah Fine, Centre for Philosophy and the Visual Arts, King’s College London.

Book Tickets here £8/£5 members & concessions.

 

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May 2019

Tate Modern, On the Couch: Franz West and Deleuze

This seminar will take place on Franz West‘s own couches artwork, which were intended to be used in this way. Led by Dr Henry Somers-Hall , in collaboration with Dr. Sacha Golob. The seminars will be followed by a private view of the exhibition.

In collaboration with King’s College London’s Centre for Philosophy and the Visual Arts.

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March 2019

Tate Modern, Exploring Franz West

Explore the impact of the father of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, on Franz West’s work

Led by Dr Thomas Khurana, in collaboration with Dr. Sacha Golob, this seminar provides an accessible and engaging introduction to Freud in relation to Franz West.

The seminars will be followed by a private view of the exhibition.

In collaboration with King’s College London’s Centre for Philosophy and the Visual Arts.

 

Feb – March 2019

Art|Philosophy
Migration, Meaning, Time: CPVA Artists in Residence. Bush House Arcade, London

Exhibition: 1000-1700 Weekdays, Tue 26th Feb – Fri 22nd March (Free)

 

May 2018

ALL TOO HUMAN: BACON, FREUD AND A CENTURY OF PAINTING LIFE @ Tate Britain, . Session 3:

‘Anxiety’.“Every change is a form of liberation. My mother used to say a change is always good even if it’s for the worse.”

Paula Rego

The onset of anxiety is disorientating and can feel dispossessing – but is anxiety bad? How does anxiety arise? What does it make us alert to? Can it lead to a more authentic outlook?

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Join us on the 12th May, 19th May and 2nd June at Tate Britain’s Clore Auditorium and find out more about the sensuous, immediate and intense experience of life in paint, as captured by these painters who strove to represent human figures, their relationships and surroundings in the most intimate of ways.

To book tickets for the sessions,

Each event will consist of a panel discussion followed by an additional seminar led by experts from CPVA, allowing a closer look at the philosophical texts and arguments in play.

What Makes Us Human: anxiety

Corvi-Mora

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye Coterie Of Questions (2015) Private Collection

There is much talk in the media about the new or toxic levels of anxiety facing many of us today. But there is much can we learn about anxiety from artists and philosophers who have contemplated it using very different mediums. CPVA is delighted to invite you to join us for an exploration of and discussion about Anxiety in the light of the selection of this unparalleled selection of paintings, brought together for a short while, at the Tate Britain.

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Following this event there will be a seminar from 15.30–17.30 in the Duffield Room. Experts from King’s College London’s Centre for Philosophy and the Visual Arts to look more closely at some of the most influential modern philosophy on anxiety and on mood.

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‘Philosophy in the Gallery’ is a collaboration between The Centre for Philosophy and the Visual Arts at King’s College London and Tate, supported by the Cultural Institute at King’s.

ALL TOO HUMAN: BACON, FREUD AND A CENTURY OF PAINTING LIFE @ Tate Britain, May 2018. Session 2: ‘The Body’

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“Whenever I really want to know what someone looks like I always ask a queer – because homosexuals are always more ruthless and more precise about appearance. After all, they spend their whole lives watching themselves and others, then pulling the way they look to pieces.”

Francis Bacon

Are we just our bodies? Or are our bodies merely attached and inferior to our minds? Are our bodily feelings really ‘making’ our decisions? Should we surrender to the body? Have we diminished ourselves by taming or repressing the body?

Featuring the work of Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon alongside rarely seen work from their contemporaries including Frank Auerbach and Paula Rego, the exhibition explores questions central to who we are and how we see ourselves – questions about the body.

Book tickets  

Join us on the 12th May, 19th May and 2nd June at Tate Britain’s Clore Auditorium and find out more about the sensuous, immediate and intense experience of life in paint, as captured by these painters who strove to represent human figures, their relationships and surroundings in the most intimate of ways.

To book tickets for the sessions,

Each event will consist of a panel discussion followed by an additional seminar led by experts from CPVA, allowing a closer look at the philosophical texts and arguments in play.

What Makes Us Human: The Body

19 May 2018 at 13.00–15.00 and 15.30–17.30

This event is the second part of the three-part series: What Makes Us Human: Conversations on Art and Philosophy.

Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud, 1964 (oil on canvas)

Francis Bacon Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud (1964) Private Collection

Book tickets  

Join artists, historians and philosophers for a discussion around the concept of the body in response to the All Too Human exhibition

Following this event there will be a seminar from 15.30–17.30 in the Duffield Room. Experts from King’s College London’s Centre for Philosophy and the Visual Arts to look more closely at some of the most influential modern philosophy on the body and embodiment.

This event is part of the three-part series: What Makes Us Human: Conversations on Art and Philosophy.

Book tickets

‘Philosophy in the Gallery’ is a collaboration between The Centre for Philosophy and the Visual Arts at King’s College London and Tate, supported by the Cultural Institute at King’s.

CPVA at Tate – ‘All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life’

CPVA is delighted to announce an upcoming series of lectures, panels and workshops examining the philosophical context and implications of Tate Britain’s 2018 ‘All Too Human’ Exhibition.

Girl with a White Dog 1950-1 by Lucian Freud 1922-2011

Details on the exhibition and booking can be found here.

Details on the lectures and workshops will be posted on this page.

CPVA would like to acknowledge the generous support provided for this project by the King’s Cultural Institute.

 

Salon: Jane Wildgoose and Sacha Golob in Collaboration with TCCE

janewildgooseimg Artist Jane Wildgoose and philosopher Sacha Golob discuss the concept and development of contemporary artistic practice, and some of the central themes of Jane’s work, in particular the ideas of memory, narrative and imagination.

The full event was recorded, and can be heard here.

Jane Wildgoose works across a wide range of disciplines exploring the values, narratives, and memories that become attached to remains of all kinds. Whether devising complex cabinets and installations combining hundreds of museum objects with specially devised handicrafts; researching, writing and designing a medical/musical performance based on a curious piece of Baroque music describing surgery to remove stones from the body; or co-devising a broadcast for BBC Radio examining a hair from the head of Horatio Nelson bought on eBay, Wildgoose’s appraisals of the past are transported into the present with a strong appeal to the senses and the imagination, underpinned by detailed research and thorough knowledge of the history of collecting.

janewildgoosecabinet

This salon event was organised in collaboration with TCCE, The Culture Capital Exchange.